Parole Board Got Something Very Wrong About OJAugust 12, 2017 12:00pm

OJ Simpson will be a free man in October thanks to the decision of a Nevada parole board. But the New York Times reports on a jarring oversight that perhaps could have changed board members' thinking.

During the hearing, members stated that Simpson had no criminal convictions. Not true. He was, of course, acquitted in his famous murder trial, but prior to that, in 1989, he pleaded no contest to misdemeanor battery of wife Nicole Brown Simpson.

The problem is, that court result for some reason never made it into a giant FBI database, known as the National Crime Information Center, upon which parole board officials around the country base their decisions.



Nevada officials recently re-checked the NCIC after an inquiry from the Times and still came up empty. "This most recent report also makes no mention of the 1989 California court record," says a state parole board official.

Would it have made a difference? Tough to say. Board members won't comment, and Simpson, now 70, had no behavioral blemishes on his prison record. And, no, the oversight isn't cause to have the decision reviewed.

CNN has more details on the 1989 assault, after which Nicole Brown Simpson told police she feared Simpson was going to kill her. (The famous white Ford Bronco in Simpson's police chase can be yours, for a price.)

This article originally appeared on Newser: Parole Board Got Something Very Wrong About OJ

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Shouts of 'Heil Hitler' Before Shooting After Richard Spencer Speech
Murders of Florida Bus Riders Have Police Hunting a KillerWhen asked Friday if Tampa has a serial killer on the loose, police chief Brian Dugan didn't deny the possibility. "We can call it what we want," the Tampa Bay Times quotes Dugan as saying. "If that brings attention to it, that's fine." Three people have been killed in the...
FILE - In this April 15, 2011, file photo, a bottle of Johnson's baby powder is displayed in San Francisco. A judge on Friday, Oct. 20, 2017 tossed out a $417 million jury award to a woman who claimed she developed ovarian cancer by using Johnson & Johnson talc-based baby powder for feminine hygiene. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Maren Nelson granted the company's request for a new trial, saying there were errors and jury misconduct in the previous trial that ended with the award two months ago. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
Judge tosses $417M award against Johnson & Johnson
Oregon senator punished over alleged inappropriate touchingThe president of the Oregon State Senate says he has stripped a senator of all his committee assignments because of "ongoing workplace issues."
US says vote likely Monday on Syrian chemical weapons probeThe United States has put a resolution that would extend the work of inspectors seeking to determine who is responsible for chemical weapons attacks in Syria into a final form and says a vote is likely on Monday
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices